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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that'all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more jobs, less unemployment. the september numbers offered the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the presid
rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. ma
's magness arena for the first of three election debates. tonight's encounter, moderated by the "newshour's" own jim lehrer, is to focus on domestic policy. the first half of the 90-minute face-off will be spent on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands of the two that the most important thing is not making a mistake but really making a point as to what his presidency would be about. i think both of them are geared because so much has been-- attention has been directed to gaffes in the past that affected or influenced, shamed the outcome, that impression. it's a magic moment. with no pundits, no prism of edtorm columnists, 60 million individuals sit down in a
the election, he's saying that his big, bold idea is, "never mind." and the fact is that if you are lowering the rates the way you described, governor, then it is not possible to come up with enough deductions and loopholes that only affect high-income individuals to avoid either raising the deficit or burdening the middle class. it's... it's math. it's arithmetic. >> woodruff: with the first debate behind them, the president headed on to wisconsin, and romney to virginia. their next face-off comes october 16th in hempstead, new york. >> brown: we hone in now on some of the claims and counter-claims over taxes and the deficit. and for that we've asked back two economists who've joined us several times this election season. jared bernstein served as chief economist and adviser to vice president biden from 2009 to 2011. he's now a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities. douglas holtz-akin is a former director of the congressional budget office. he was chief economics adviser to john mccain's presidential campaign and is now president of the american action forum, a policy
've had 10 presidential elections with televised debates. in three of them one candidate went into the first debate leading and another candidate came out of the last debate leading much it's turnedded campaigns in 1960 and 1980 and in 2000. so it can be done but it's a high task for sure. >> remember, we've been campaigning or we haven't been campaigning but the candidates have been campaigning for six months now. >> woodruff: do you agree with susan that a debate can change the trajectory of a race? >> i do. i think it can but it doesn't... it wasn't automatically change a trajectory. something significant has to happen. one of the contestants, one of the debaters has to say something that produces a lot of controversy for two or three days or do something, whether it's a... make a face, look at his watch. something has to happen that the voters look at. it changes how they evaluate the candidate. judy, the way i would put it is everybody needs to take a collective breath after this and say, wait a minute, maybe i need to reassess the campaign. that's what the romney folks n
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)